HOW TO WRITE AN ANALYTICAL ESSAY THAT WILL CRUSH IT IN ANY COURSE

HOW TO WRITE AN ANALYTICAL ESSAY THAT WILL CRUSH IT IN ANY COURSE

Wondering how to write an analytical essay? You’ve come to the right place. If you find yourself faced with the task of writing an analytical essay and you’re not even sure how to get past the essay question, it’s time to get some help.

When you receive those assignment instructions, but don’t really know what you’re doing, it’s common to feel like all hope is lost and you’re never going to be able to produce a well written essay. Especially if you’re not even sure what an analytical essay is. How are you supposed to know where to start?

Don’t give up – there is hope after all. If you’re feeling lost or confused, or just not interested in your assignment, we’re here to guide you through the process and show you how to write an analytical essay that will help you get the grade you need to succeed in your course, no matter what program you’re taking.

In this blog, we’re going to walk you through the basics, from learning what exactly an analytical essay is to writing a paper that is ready to impress. Let’s go ahead and jump right in.

WHAT EXACTLY IS AN ANALYTICAL ESSAY?

Your first step in learning how to write an analytical essay is learning what exactly an analytical essay is.

The official analytical essay definition can be taken from the official definition of an analysis (from dictionary.com): the separating of any material or abstract entity into its constituent elements, and using this process as a method of studying the nature of something or of determining its essential features and their relations. To make it an essay, this process is applied within your writing. But what does that really mean?

That’s pretty confusing, so let’s break it down.

In an analytical essay, you are going to analyze, critique, interpret, and/or dissect the main points of something. This could be an author or artist’s work, an event in history, or even a concept. To do this, you will break down the author or artist’s piece into smaller topics or subtopics, analyze them, and use them to formulate an argument or point about the text.

Don’t get caught up and confuse an analytical essay with a rhetorical analysis essay. They may both be based on the idea of an analysis, but they are two different things.

Essentially, in basic terms, your objective with this paper is to explain the significance of something and use specific points to showcase that. You’re not just summarizing what happened. You are presenting evidence or an argument about something.

For example, let’s say you’re writing about Lady Macbeth’s descent into madness in Shakespeare’s Macbeth. You’re not just going to write about the fact that she is going mad as she lays sick in bed and her doctor is treating her. Instead, you’re going to talk about the fact that she’s become so overwhelmed with guilt and regret that it has taken over her brain and caused her to go mad, and you’re going to show how this is represented with examples of symbolism, imagery, and other literary devices from the play.

In the words of the University of Toronto, “The analytic essay does not simply ask what, where and when; it asks why and how.”

WHY AM I WRITING AN ANALYTICAL ESSAY, ANYWAY?

As we mentioned above, an analytical essay digs deeper into a subject and requires you to look for the meaning, themes, sub-topics, or other messages. Instead of talking about what the subject is doing, you’re talking about why the subject is doing that and what this means on a bigger scale. Therefore, your professor is asking you to write this type of essay because they are testing your ability to interpret something and think about it critically.

Your professors want to see that you have the ability to look at something and make connections with it that go beyond just reading about it and memorizing facts. Critical thinking is a skill you’re probably going to need to use throughout your academic and professional career, and this is a great time to practice those skills.

To make yourself more motivated to finish your paper, you can think of this assignment as your professor helping set you up with important skills for the future instead of forcing you to write an essay you don’t want to write.

TYPES OF ANALYTICAL ESSAYS

There are actually a few different types of analytical essays out there that you can choose from. It’s important to make sure you’re writing the type of essay that your professor is looking for – your goal is to get the highest mark possible, not lose marks on things that could have been avoided if you’d just followed the instructions in the first place.

Here are some of the more common types of analytical essays you might need to write in college or university:

● Literary analysis essay: A literary analysis essay is a type of analytical essay that focuses on a literary text, such as a play, book, or poem. With a literary analysis, you’ll need to closely examine the text and interpret it on a deeper level.

● Compare and contrast essay: In a compare and contrast essay, you’re going to do exactly that – compare and contrast two or more subjects to determine what their similarities and differences are, or where the authors agree or disagree.

● Cause and effect essay: A cause and effect essay looks at the factors that lead to an outcome, and then the results of that outcome. In other words, it’s an analysis of how one thing leads to another (or how the cause leads to the effect).

● Classification essay: A less common type of analytical essay you’ll encounter, the classification essay takes certain subjects or topics and organizes them into categories through an analysis of their characteristics, features, and so on.

WRITING A RHETORICAL ANALYSIS ESSAY? HERE’S EVERYTHING YOU WILL EVER NEED TO KNOW

WRITING A RHETORICAL ANALYSIS ESSAY? HERE’S EVERYTHING YOU WILL EVER NEED TO KNOW

Writing a rhetorical analysis essay is tricky, especially if you have no idea what you’re doing. If you’re not sure where to start, sometimes you can end up sitting in front of your computer screen for hours wondering why you’re doing this to yourself.

There are a lot of layers when it comes to any type of analysis, especially one based on an author’s use of rhetoric. Understanding rhetorical writing is one thing. Writing about rhetorical writing is a whole new ball game, and it can be exhausting.

No one said college was going to be easy. But with our help, you will learn how to write an effective rhetorical analysis essay so well, it’ll feel like you’ve been doing this your entire life. Don’t believe us? Read this and give it a try. We promise you’ll be satisfied with the results.

WHAT IS RHETORIC?

First thing’s first – to write a good rhetorical analysis essay, you need to understand rhetoric.

Essentially, rhetoric is the art of persuasion through writing. It’s the technique and type of language used to connect to audiences and convince people to believe a certain point of view or message.

Rhetoric is a concept that was first coined by Aristotle in Ancient Greece. Back in his day, it was important for influential people to use rhetoric to help shape societies and influence change. No one in Ancient Greece could quickly Google something when trying to think for themselves. They had to take peoples’ word for it, and that meant that those influential people needed to make sure they used the right rhetorical techniques to get people to believe them or stand up for their cause.

Since then, rhetoric has been used for over 2,000 years to appeal to or influence audiences as a persuasion technique and still remains an important part of today’s language.

RHETORIC IN THE REAL WORLD

You’ve seen rhetoric many times in your life. Rhetorical strategies are used in every political speech, opinion article, argumentative essay, and advertisement. Every TED Talk you’ve ever watched involves rhetorical strategies, and the same goes for every commercial you’ve seen or every documentary you’ve watched.

Politicians use rhetoric in their speeches in order to gain support from potential voters and campaigners in specific demographics. For example, if you were running for Premiere of a province in Canada and you were delivering a speech to an audience of teachers and educators, you wouldn’t spend an hour talking about the tax breaks you’re giving to commercial businesses. You would want to focus on the positive changes you would make within the education system or to improve child care programs because those are the topics that directly affect that specific audience. You’d likely also use a different language to speak to this audience than you would to a group of senior citizens or factory workers in order to better connect with them.

Think about Martin Luther King, Jr.’s iconic “I Have a Dream” speech. Why do you think this speech resonated with so many people and became one of the most well known speeches in history? It’s all thanks to King’s use of rhetorical writing. He made his audience really feel the pain that African Americans were going through in the segregated ‘60s and appealed to emotions to promote the need for equal treatment between races. And it worked.

SO WHAT DOES THIS HAVE TO DO WITH MY ESSAY?

Now you know what rhetoric is. But you may be wondering what the point of that brief rhetoric lesson was and what it has to do with your essay. The answer is quite simple: a rhetorical analysis essay is an essay in which you analyze a text for its use of rhetoric, or rhetorical writing. Make sense now?

Your job in your paper is to look at the author’s use of rhetorical writing and determine what techniques they’ve used, as well as how effective those techniques are overall. Just to be clear, your goal is not to add your opinions on the topics or dive into your standpoint or point of view on the subject. You’re going to analyze the author’s use of persuasion specifically.

HOW TO ANALYZE A TEXT

Now that you understand what it is we have to do here, let’s move on to the next step: learning how to analyze the text. It’s important to do this step before you get into the analysis of persuasion because you need to know how to identify specific elements within the article and how to break the article down to dig deeper into its structure.

Try using the SOAPSTone strategy. This is a strategy used to remember what elements to look for and identify when reading an article, text, or anything else. SOAPSTone stands for:

● S – Speaker: Who is telling the story or providing the information?

● O – Occasion: What is the context behind the author’s decision to write the article?

● A – Audience: Who is the author writing to?

● P – Purpose: Why has the author written this piece? In other words, why is the author trying to convince their audience to do something or think a specific way?

● S – Subject: What specific point is the author making?

● Tone: What is the overall attitude or tone that the author is giving off?

Once you understand how to analyze a text, you should understand what it is you’re looking for when you’re writing a rhetorical analysis. Looking for and finding the answers to each of these elements is an essential step in breaking down what you’re reading and choosing items to analyze. Understanding all of this information gives you the background and context you need to understand the author’s rhetorical position and the techniques they’re using to convey that point of view.

GET THE CONTEXT FIRST

Before you start digging deep into the rhetorical writing styles and techniques you’ll need to discuss, it’s important to gather contextual information. This includes the target audience, the setting, the point they’re making, and so on. Some of this you would have already done if you performed the SOAPSTone strategy outlined above. The rest you can piece together as your next step.

Since you’re writing a rhetorical analysis essay, which will focus on the way your author has expressed their point of view to their audience, you’ll need to have this contextual information on hand when you analyze their techniques. You can’t actively determine that someone didn’t make a good connection with their audience if you don’t make it clear who that audience is.

The following questions will help guide you as you look for context and background information:
Who is the author’s target audience?
What is the point of view the author is trying to argue? In other words, what is their point? What are they trying to get their audience to think or do?
If it’s a speech, where and when was the speech given?
If your text is a book, movie, or other medium, when was it written or made?
What is the overall tone of the text? For example, is it meant to scare someone into making a decision, or excite someone to join a cause?

Knowing and understanding this information will help you with your analysis. In fact, most of the time your professor will outline this information as a requirement in your instructions or rubric. You should include these details in your introduction, or if it’s a longer analysis (think five pages or more) in your first body paragraph.

WRITING A RHETORICAL ANALYSIS ESSAY? HERE’S EVERYTHING YOU WILL EVER NEED TO KNOW

WRITING A RHETORICAL ANALYSIS ESSAY? HERE’S EVERYTHING YOU WILL EVER NEED TO KNOW

Writing a rhetorical analysis essay is tricky, especially if you have no idea what you’re doing. If you’re not sure where to start, sometimes you can end up sitting in front of your computer screen for hours wondering why you’re doing this to yourself.

There are a lot of layers when it comes to any type of analysis, especially one based on an author’s use of rhetoric. Understanding rhetorical writing is one thing. Writing about rhetorical writing is a whole new ball game, and it can be exhausting.

No one said college was going to be easy. But with our help, you will learn how to write an effective rhetorical analysis essay so well, it’ll feel like you’ve been doing this your entire life. Don’t believe us? Read this and give it a try. We promise you’ll be satisfied with the results.

WHAT IS RHETORIC?

First thing’s first – to write a good rhetorical analysis essay, you need to understand rhetoric.

Essentially, rhetoric is the art of persuasion through writing. It’s the technique and type of language used to connect to audiences and convince people to believe a certain point of view or message.

Rhetoric is a concept that was first coined by Aristotle in Ancient Greece. Back in his day, it was important for influential people to use rhetoric to help shape societies and influence change. No one in Ancient Greece could quickly Google something when trying to think for themselves. They had to take peoples’ word for it, and that meant that those influential people needed to make sure they used the right rhetorical techniques to get people to believe them or stand up for their cause.

Since then, rhetoric has been used for over 2,000 years to appeal to or influence audiences as a persuasion technique and still remains an important part of today’s language.

RHETORIC IN THE REAL WORLD

You’ve seen rhetoric many times in your life. Rhetorical strategies are used in every political speech, opinion article, argumentative essay, and advertisement. Every TED Talk you’ve ever watched involves rhetorical strategies, and the same goes for every commercial you’ve seen or every documentary you’ve watched.

Politicians use rhetoric in their speeches in order to gain support from potential voters and campaigners in specific demographics. For example, if you were running for Premiere of a province in Canada and you were delivering a speech to an audience of teachers and educators, you wouldn’t spend an hour talking about the tax breaks you’re giving to commercial businesses. You would want to focus on the positive changes you would make within the education system or to improve child care programs because those are the topics that directly affect that specific audience. You’d likely also use a different language to speak to this audience than you would to a group of senior citizens or factory workers in order to better connect with them.

Think about Martin Luther King, Jr.’s iconic “I Have a Dream” speech. Why do you think this speech resonated with so many people and became one of the most well known speeches in history? It’s all thanks to King’s use of rhetorical writing. He made his audience really feel the pain that African Americans were going through in the segregated ‘60s and appealed to emotions to promote the need for equal treatment between races. And it worked.

SO WHAT DOES THIS HAVE TO DO WITH MY ESSAY?

Now you know what rhetoric is. But you may be wondering what the point of that brief rhetoric lesson was and what it has to do with your essay. The answer is quite simple: a rhetorical analysis essay is an essay in which you analyze a text for its use of rhetoric, or rhetorical writing. Make sense now?

Your job in your paper is to look at the author’s use of rhetorical writing and determine what techniques they’ve used, as well as how effective those techniques are overall. Just to be clear, your goal is not to add your opinions on the topics or dive into your standpoint or point of view on the subject. You’re going to analyze the author’s use of persuasion specifically.

HOW TO ANALYZE A TEXT

Now that you understand what it is we have to do here, let’s move on to the next step: learning how to analyze the text. It’s important to do this step before you get into the analysis of persuasion because you need to know how to identify specific elements within the article and how to break the article down to dig deeper into its structure.

Try using the SOAPSTone strategy. This is a strategy used to remember what elements to look for and identify when reading an article, text, or anything else. SOAPSTone stands for:

● S – Speaker: Who is telling the story or providing the information?

● O – Occasion: What is the context behind the author’s decision to write the article?

● A – Audience: Who is the author writing to?

● P – Purpose: Why has the author written this piece? In other words, why is the author trying to convince their audience to do something or think a specific way?

● S – Subject: What specific point is the author making?

● Tone: What is the overall attitude or tone that the author is giving off?

Once you understand how to analyze a text, you should understand what it is you’re looking for when you’re writing a rhetorical analysis. Looking for and finding the answers to each of these elements is an essential step in breaking down what you’re reading and choosing items to analyze. Understanding all of this information gives you the background and context you need to understand the author’s rhetorical position and the techniques they’re using to convey that point of view.

GET THE CONTEXT FIRST

Before you start digging deep into the rhetorical writing styles and techniques you’ll need to discuss, it’s important to gather contextual information. This includes the target audience, the setting, the point they’re making, and so on. Some of this you would have already done if you performed the SOAPSTone strategy outlined above. The rest you can piece together as your next step.

Since you’re writing a rhetorical analysis essay, which will focus on the way your author has expressed their point of view to their audience, you’ll need to have this contextual information on hand when you analyze their techniques. You can’t actively determine that someone didn’t make a good connection with their audience if you don’t make it clear who that audience is.

The following questions will help guide you as you look for context and background information:
Who is the author’s target audience?
What is the point of view the author is trying to argue? In other words, what is their point? What are they trying to get their audience to think or do?
If it’s a speech, where and when was the speech given?
If your text is a book, movie, or other medium, when was it written or made?
What is the overall tone of the text? For example, is it meant to scare someone into making a decision, or excite someone to join a cause?

Knowing and understanding this information will help you with your analysis. In fact, most of the time your professor will outline this information as a requirement in your instructions or rubric. You should include these details in your introduction, or if it’s a longer analysis (think five pages or more) in your first body paragraph.

RHETORICAL TECHNIQUES OF APPEAL: PATHOS, LOGOS, AND ETHOS

Pathos, logos, and ethos, also known as Aristotle’s Three Proofs, are the core rhetorical techniques of appeal. Back in Ancient Greece, Aristotle used these three terms to explain how rhetoric and persuasion work. They are commonly used in the majority of persuasive writing, and even in most arguments or debates, advertisements, marketing strategies, and much more.

Pathos is the appeal to emotion. With pathos, you would use arguments that appeal to your reader’s emotions or try to invoke an emotional response from them. For example, if you’re writing about why animal testing is bad, you would invoke pathos by describing the pain that animals suffer while in a lab, thus making the reader feel sympathetic for the animals.

Logos is the appeal to logic. When you use logos to persuade someone of something, you use facts and logical information, data, and/or statistics to convince the reader that something is true. For example, if you’re writing a paper about the issue of obesity in America, you could include statistics on the percentage of the population that is obese to indicate the validity of your argument.

Ethos is the appeal to ethics. When you use ethos in an argument, you would establish credibility, expertise, and/or authority. So, for example, if you’re writing a paper about dinosaurs, you would invoke ethos by using information from a credible expert in the field, such as a leading paleontologist.

When using these rhetorical techniques of appeal, you can tailor the approach depending on who your audience is and what type of argument will appeal to them. For example, when writing a scientific paper to an audience of biology students, you’ll want to lean more toward logos and present valid facts or data. If you’re writing a persuasive speech about climate change, you’ll likely choose to use pathos to invoke fear or ethos to showcase what scientists have said. You can choose to include all three appeals, or you could focus on just one if it makes more sense.

Heads up – these are all really great rhetorical techniques you can use when you’re writing an argumentative essay! They can help strengthen your argument and influence your audience to believe your point of view.

HOW TO IDENTIFY PATHOS, LOGOS, AND ETHOS IN YOUR TEXT

When doing a rhetorical analysis, you want to examine your article to determine the ways the author has used these techniques to appeal to their reader. Most of the time, you can tell if the author has used pathos, logos, or ethos by the way you personally respond when you read their article. For example, if you feel sad or angry about something, that’s a good sign of pathos. However, if you’re still not really clear, here are a few lists of examples you can look for when searching for each type of appeal.

Pathos (appeal to emotion):

● Trigger words that connect to emotions

● Anecdotes or stories from witnesses, survivors, marginalized people, etc.

● Questions that prompt you to think about something

● Exclamation points

Logos (appeal to logic):

● Statistics and facts

● Direct information, like nutritional ingredients or technical specifications

● Maps, charts, and graphs

● Use of primary sources such as research studies, government documents, legal cases, or court reports

● Analogies

Ethos (appeal to ethics):

● Direct quotes from industry experts or researchers

● Testimonials or endorsements from industry leaders

● Use of peer-reviewed secondary sources

Male and female students looking at a paper together

OTHER RHETORICAL METHODS AND TERMS TO LOOK FOR

While pathos, logos, and ethos are the most common rhetorical techniques of appeal, there are also some other elements to look for within your text. Here are some other terms that are commonly used in rhetoric and the art of persuasion that should be on your radar when you analyze the text for rhetorical methods and techniques:

Hyperbole (Exaggeration): When someone exaggerates something within a text, it’s usually done to prove a point and emphasize something. For example, going back to Martin Luther King, Jr.’s classic speech, one of his lines is this: “I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, and every hill and mountain shall be made low.” Here, he’s using hyperbole to exaggerate his point that equality among humans will have a wide, far-reaching impact on the world.

Diction: An extremely important rhetorical technique, and writing device in general, diction refers to the style of speech or writing that an author uses. Writing style is very significant for rhetoric because a well-written, eloquent piece of writing has a more prominent effect, and descriptive, powerful words can leave a lasting emotional impact.

Fallacy: This is one you need to watch out for as the reader, as fallacies are often used to promote biased opinions, propaganda, deception, or manipulation. Essentially, a fallacy is the use of faulty logic or an error in reasoning. For example, the author might use an example that isn’t relevant to their argument to distract the reader, or come to a conclusion based on probability and assumptions instead of real logic. If your author is using fallacy, they are not making an effective or credible argument and are using bad rhetorical techniques.

Parallelism (Repetition): Often used in speeches, parallelism involves repeating words or phrases to emphasize something and elicit an emotional response. It also leaves a more lasting impression on the audience. John F. Kennedy used this in one of his most well-known speeches that many people still quote today: “My fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you — ask what you can do for your country.”

Rhetorical Question: A very common technique used in casual conversations or arguments, a rhetorical question is a question that you ask for emphasis without expecting an answer. They’re designed to appeal to emotions and make you think about something more reflectively.

Tone: The tone is the attitude or atmosphere that the author takes in their writing, and it plays a pretty big role in how you feel while reading. For that reason, tone is usually used to appeal to emotions. You can usually identify your author’s particular tone by examining the words and phrases they use.

Analogy: An analogy is a comparison between two things, just like a simile. When used as a rhetorical method, an analogy is a good way to add logic to something by comparing it to something else so the reader can understand it.

Personification: Another very common rhetorical technique, personification involves adding human characteristics to things that aren’t human. This appeals to the reader’s emotions because they begin to make connections, whether negative or positive, with those non-human things as if they are a person. For example, if you are arguing that smoking should be banned, you might say that “cigarettes steal health” in order to villainize cigarettes and turn your reader against them.

250 RESEARCH TOPICS FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS THAT WILL GET YOUR BRAINSTORMING JUICES FLOWING

250 RESEARCH TOPICS FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS THAT WILL GET YOUR BRAINSTORMING JUICES FLOWING

Looking for a big list of research topics for college students? You’ve come to the right place.

With a world of options at your fingertips thanks to the internet, it’s easy to fall victim to “overwhelmed with options” syndrome. It’s exhausting to try to narrow down something to write about, especially when your professor gives you a lot of creative freedom to choose your own topic.

Instead of staring at your course syllabus hoping an idea will jump out at you, let us help you make a decision that will save you a lot of time and effort. Keep reading to take a look at our master list of 250 research topics for college students to get some serious inspiration, no matter what subject or field you’re studying. Whether you need to write a research paper, put together a speech, create a presentation, write an essay, or develop a report, we have topics here that can help you narrow down a good opinion, idea, or argument.

RESEARCH IS ALWAYS IMPORTANT

Knowing how to do proper research is an important skill to have in both your academic and professional careers. No matter what you do, at some point in your life you’ll need to be able to take a topic, analyze the information, and put together a conclusion about it.

During your academic career in college or university, you will need to be able to do research whenever you need to do any written assignments. Quality research and credible references are always the backbone of any academic writing project.

Once you graduate, the work won’t always be over. There are many different reasons you may need to do some research in your professional career. If you’re going to start a business, you’re going to need to know how to do research and analysis. Likewise, if you want to work in marketing and advertising, digital media, journalism, the sciences, health care, or another professional industry like the legal field or social work, you’re going to be doing a lot of research in the future. In fact, there aren’t many job industries that won’t require some type of research at some point in time.

The bottom line is that research is always going to be important, and knowing how to find good research material, narrow down a good research topic, and analyze the data are always going to be important skills you need to have.

CHOOSING THE RIGHT SUBJECT FOR YOUR ASSIGNMENT

Finding good research topics for college students comes down to a few different factors. You want to make sure that the subject you choose checks off the right boxes. Otherwise, you’ll be stuck doing a lot more work than you planned, and no one wants to be doing that.

● Interest level: First and foremost, your topic should be something you are actually interested in. It’s really hard to motivate yourself to research and write something if you don’t care about it in the first place. Additionally, how are you going to get your audience interested in something if you don’t care about it?

● Background knowledge: What do you already know about your topic? Even if you just have a small idea or opinion about something, that little bit of background information will help you as a foundation for the research process.

● Audience: You have to keep in mind the audience you’re going to be writing or speaking to. Is this something that’s going to be interesting to them? When you’re doing research for a specific class, make sure that the topic is covered in that class. Otherwise, no one is going to care what you have to say.

● Available information: Make sure there’s enough research material out there for the subject or topic you choose. The last thing you want to do is spend hours sifting through sources just to find that you don’t have enough information to actually do your assignment.

250 POWERFUL RESEARCH TOPICS FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS

Ready to figure out what research topics you’re going to try out? Check out our massive list below. Each of these research topics will be a great starting point for brainstorming, breaking down arguments, and making connections to other concepts.

For specific paper topics, check out our other master lists of 200 informative speech topics or 100 argumentative essay topics. Our team of experts has put together some amazing references for you so you can always find something that works for your assignment.

Once you’ve figured out which topic you’d like to use, keep reading to learn how to find good research and sources, start putting together an idea or opinion, and start working on your project.

ANCIENT HISTORY TOPICS (PRE-HISTORY TO 476 A.D.)

1. Ancient Greek society
2. Mesopotamia and the origins of human civilization
3. Ancient Egyptian society
4. Cave drawings and the first methods of communication
5. Central Asian societies in the ancient world
6. Burial practices in ancient cultures
7. The Gupta Empire
8. The Maya civilization
9. Prehistoric North America (Native American and Indigenous peoples)
10. The Silk Road and the origins of trade
11. The Iron Age
12. The Bronze Age
13. The Out of Africa theory
14. Dinosaurs
15. Celtic history and origins of the celts
16. The Chinese Book of Han
17. Ancient Japanese cultures and societies
18. The ancient Persian Empire
19. The Trojan War
20. Ancient mythology

POST-CLASSICAL AND MEDIEVAL HISTORY (477 TO 1499)

21. The Aztec Empire
22. The fall of the Western Roman Empire
23. The Holy Roman Empire
24. Medieval castles and their monarchies
25. Technological advancements in the Middle Ages
26. Islamic rule in India and Africa
27. Timur’s invasion in India
28. The rise of the Ottoman Empire
29. The gold trade of Africa
30. The Byzantine Empire
31. The rise of the Catholic Church
32. Medieval leaders, knights, and warriors (William Wallace, William the Conqueror, Charlemagne, King Arthur, Joan of Arc, etc.)
33. The Black Death in Europe
34. The fall of Constantinople
35. Genghis Khan and the Mongol Empire
36. The Crusades
37. Medieval writers, thinkers, and creators (Dante Alighieri, Petrarch, Homer, Marie de France, Margery Kempe, Johann Gutenberg, etc.)
38. The Hundred Years’ War
39. Gothic architecture
40. Medieval medicine and healing practices

EARLY MODERN AND MODERN HISTORY TOPICS (1500-PRESENT)

41. Conquest of the Americas
42. Martin Luther and the 99 Theses
43. The Scientific Revolution
44. The Salem Witch Trials
45. The Age of Discovery
46. Early modern writers, thinkers, and inventors (Leonardo DaVinci, Michelangelo, Galileo Galilei, William Shakespeare, Isaac Newton, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Edison, etc.)
47. Renaissance art and discovery
48. The French Revolution
49. The British monarchy
50. The American Revolution
51. The Age of Enlightenment
52. The Irish War of Independence
53. The Victorian Era
54. The Atlantic Slave Trade
55. Military generals in the American Civil War
56. World War II
57. The Civil Rights Movement
58. The Vietnam War
59. Operation Desert Storm
60. 9/11 and global terrorism

ENGLISH AND LITERATURE RESEARCH TOPICS FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS

61. Symbolism in literature
62. Classic literary authors (Jane Austen, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Charles Dickens, Edgar Allan Poe, Victor Hugo, Jules Verne, H.G. Wells, etc.)
63. Mythology as/in literature
64. Romance and sexuality in literature
65. Dramatic irony in literature
66. Literature as propaganda
67. LGBTQ2+ Literature
68. The hero’s journey in fiction
69. Character archetypes
70. Old English language and literature
71. Genres of fiction (fantasy, horror, science fiction, historical fiction, romance, etc.)
72. Utopian and dystopian depictions in literature
73. Good vs. evil in literature
74. Native American literature and storytelling
75. Religious literature
76. Feminist and women’s literature
77. Children’s literature
78. Black literature and literary voices
79. Literary devices and analysis
80. Literary criticism

MUSIC, FILM, AND POP CULTURE TOPICS

81. Movie adaptations of books
82. Symbolism in film
83. Prolific directors and their work (Quentin Tarantino, Martin Scorsese, Christopher Nolan, Woody Allen, Steven Spielberg, Stanley Kubrick, Tim Burton, James Cameron, etc.)
84. Violence in film and television
85. Stereotypes in popular culture
86. Music genres and their associated sub-cultures
87. The role of music and song in activist movements
88. Jazz in New Orleans
89. Cinema scores and compositions
90. Classical Hollywood cinema
91. Soap opera dynasties
92. Spaghetti Western films
93. Streaming services and the music industry
94. Portrayals of superheroes in movies and television shows
95. “Fandom” culture
96. Gender equality in Hollywood
97. Legendary actors, bands, and musicians
98. Paparazzi and celebrity worship
99. Reality television shows
100. Satire in film and television

CURRENT AFFAIRS AND HUMAN RIGHTS TOPICS

101. Immigration policies, practices, or laws
102. Women’s rights
103. Activist movements such as Black Lives Matter, Everytown For Gun Safety, Time’s Up, or the School Strike For Climate
104. Animal rights or animal cruelty
105. The United Nations
106. Gun safety and control policies
107. Climate change
108. Rural and urban poverty
109. Homelessness
110. Global or national terrorism
111. Modern warfare practices
112. Multiculturalism and nationalism
113. The crisis in Syria
114. Global peacekeeping
115. China’s One Belt One Road project
116. Urban slums in third world countries and developing nations
117. Capital punishment
118. Domestic violence
119. Disability and human rights
120. Internal displacement of Indigenous populations

RESEARCH TOPICS FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS STUDYING THE SCIENCES

121. Natural disasters
122. Climate change
123. Future predictions based on patterns and data
124. Animal populations
125. GMOs
126. Organic farming
127. Darwinism
128. Space exploration
129. Ecological conservation
130. Amino acids
131. Molecular biology
132. Genetic engineering
133. Cloning
134. Stem cell research
135. Dark matter
136. Hormone regulation
137. Plant life
138. Black holes in space
139. The Higgs boson
140. Cloud formation and weather patterns

MEDICINE, NURSING, AND HEALTH-RELATED SUBJECTS

141. Vaccines
142. Homeopathic medicine and natural medicine
143. Health care reform
144. Diseases
145. Caring for the elderly
146. Failure-to-thrive infants
147. Cardiovascular care
148. Child care
149. Hormone replacement therapy
150. Neonatal nutrition and care
151. Sun safety and awareness
152. Women’s health care issues
153. Men’s health care issues
154. Transgender health care issues
155. Reconstructive surgery
156. Plastic surgery
157. Exercise and physical health
158. Nutrition and food
159. Catastrophic injuries
160. Acupuncture

SOCIOLOGY AND PSYCHOLOGY RESEARCH TOPICS

161. Cults
162. Class conflict and inequality
163. Phobias
164. Abnormal psychology
165. Autism and diagnosis
166. ADD and ADHD
167. Other mental illnesses (bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, depression, anxiety, psychosis, OCD, PTSD)
168. Cultural connections with food
169. Family relationships
170. Addiction and substance abuse
171. Divorce
172. The nuclear family
173. Gender roles and equality
174. Youth culture
175. Social media and modern networking
176. Freud’s theories
177. Fad dieting
178. Eating disorders
179. Nonverbal communication
180. Social cognition

LAW AND POLITICS RESEARCH TOPICS

181. Voting and election reform
182. Administrative law
183. Personal injury law
184. Business and Corporate law
185. Aboriginal self-governance
186. Law reform
187. Landlord and tenant issues
188. Self-representation in court
189. Youth justice
190. Legal aid
191. Refugees and asylum seekers
192. Landmark court decisions (Roe v. Wade, R v. Brown, Plessy v. Ferguson, Brown v. Board of Education, etc.)
193. Censorship laws
194. Privacy laws
195. Discrimination and hate crimes
196. The Supreme Court
197. Family law
198. Criminal law
199. Citizenship and immigration
200. The United States electoral college

EDUCATION-BASED RESEARCH TOPICS FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS

201. Boarding schools
202. Sexual education
203. Education access
204. Digital literacy in the classroom
205. Standardized testing
206. STEM education
207. Plagiarism
208. College athletes
209. Free tuition
210. Home schooling
211. Religious-based education
212. Charter schools
213. Accessible education for disabilities
214. Sororities and fraternities in the United States
215. Teachers’ unions
216. The No Child Left Behind Act
217. Early childhood education
218. Native American education
219. International students and studying abroad
220. Student mental health

TECHNOLOGY, MEDIA, AND COMPUTER-RELATED TOPICS

221. Bitcoin and online currency
222. Artificial intelligence
223. Technological developments
224. Social media
225. Smartphones
226. Cyberbullying
227. The Dark Web
228. Internet crimes
229. Self-driving cars
230. Internet privacy
231. Internet ownership
232. Technology and intimacy
233. Online scams
234. Ecommerce business
235. Website development
236. Graphic design
237. Drone technology
238. Information storage
239. Cloud-based computing
240. Servers and hosting networks

MARKETING AND ADVERTISING RESEARCH TOPICS

241. Digital marketing
242. Behavioural targeting
243. Super Bowl commercials
244. Marketing and sales funnels
245. The buyer’s journey
246. Content marketing
247. Search engine optimization (SEO)
248. Gender stereotypes in advertising
249. Children’s advertising
250. Business fraud

HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR WRITING SKILLS (EVEN IF YOU’RE NOT A PROFESSIONAL WRITER)

HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR WRITING SKILLS (EVEN IF YOU’RE NOT A PROFESSIONAL WRITER)

Learning how to improve your writing skills is an important way to master practical skills you’ll need throughout your life, even if you don’t consider yourself a good writer.

Everyone should have some basic sense of writing skills, even if you’re shooting for a career path that isn’t writing-based. No matter who you are or what you do, you’re always going to need to know how to write emails, reports, cover letters, and other professional documents throughout your career.

Just like food fuels your body, practicing and improving on your writing skills fuels your mind. You don’t just eat one meal to survive – you eat every day to continue nourishing your physical capabilities and live your life. The same thing goes for writing. Even if you’ve been writing essays forever and have a general sense of the skill, you should always want to improve yourself. Fortunately, our writing team at Homework Help Global is the best place to go to for tips and advice to help you get there, and we’re here to help.

Here are some foolproof tips on how to improve your writing skills right from the minds of our brilliant writing team, guaranteed to help you hone in on your skills and produce high-quality written content, no matter what purpose you need it for.

ALWAYS BRUSH UP ON YOUR GRAMMAR AND PUNCTUATION

The first place you should start when it comes to learning how to improve your writing skills is the English language itself. No matter what your background with the English language is, whether you’ve been speaking English your entire life or you’ve learned it as a second language, there is always room to improve your grammar.

Of course, as a student, your professor is going to be grading you on your use of grammar, but it’s about more than just surface value. Grammar is the backbone of the English language, and it teaches us exactly how to formulate sentences and communicate ideas in a constructive, effective way.

Grammar and punctuation mistakes don’t just impact your ability to write academically – they make you look bad in a professional setting, too. There is nothing more unprofessional and easily avoidable than a typo on a professional product, like a menu or an advertisement.

Take the time to occasionally brush up on your knowledge of grammar and punctuation. Bookmark grammar websites like The Grammar Book or Grammar.com to keep as a reference and a teaching tool. Use an app like Grammarly while you write to help you catch any mistakes in real time. It’s never too late to brush up on these skills, and they will pay off in the long run.

READ YOUR WAY TO BETTER WRITING SKILLS

Yes, you read that correctly – reading more can actually help you learn how to improve your writing skills. The more you read, the more familiar you are with good writing, and the more ideas you’ll get to put your own skills to work.

Read anything you can. Whether it’s a novel, a textbook, or even just news articles, absorb everything you’re interested in reading. The more variety you introduce into your reading schedule, the more well-rounded your own approach will become, and you can start to recognize different types of writing.

When you read, you start to notice the techniques and writing styles that other authors are using. You also start to notice whether those techniques and writing styles work well or not. While reading, if you see something you really like or that stands out to you, make note of it so you can practice it in your own writing.

WORK WITH AN OUTLINE

Good writing flows properly, effectively communicates a message, and gives the reader a clear point to follow. How do you make sure that you have good flow and structure? With an outline!

No matter what you’re writing, whether it’s a piece of fiction or an academic essay, use an outline to organize your thoughts before you dive into the writing process. Adding your points to an outline helps you organize the structure and determine which points to focus on, and which order you’ll do this in.

If you’re writing an academic essay, an outline is a great way to track what type of points and evidence you’re going to need from your research. This helps you avoid wasting your time digging through library databases and search engines trying to find an argument that will work.

Additionally, if you run into writer’s block along the way, going back to your outline can be a helpful way to re-motivate yourself or get back into the zone. You’ll be much less likely to get stuck if you have a clear outline that guides the flow of your work.

READ YOUR WRITING AS YOUR AUDIENCE

If you want to really learn how to improve your writing skills, you need to be able to visualize yourself as your reader. This is the best way to make sure that you convey your point and that your message is structured well enough to leave a lasting impression.

Read through your work and pretend you’re reading this as an audience member. Ask yourself the following questions:

● Did you give your reader enough information to convey your point?

● Can you visualize your message in your head based on what you’ve written?

● Do your sentences make sense to an outsider or someone with little background information?

● Would you agree with this message if you didn’t write it yourself?

If you can’t answer yes to these questions honestly, it’s time to go through your work and refine your writing.